Posts Tagged ‘web design mood board’

Using a Mood Board to Communicate Ideas with Your Web Designer

Creating a website is a daunting task that most small businesses avoid for as long as possible, but if you need one, then you do want to do it right. That means hiring a web development and design team, and communicating your wants, needs, and preferences with them, to ensure that the end result is something that you and your customers love. While providing your brand material, your brand personality, and preferred styles and colors is important, you can take your preparations a step further with a mood board.

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What is a Mood Board?

A mood board is a digital or analog (physical) board with images, pictures, swatches, or colors that show what you want, what you’re thinking, and convey the emotions that you want your website to convey. If you’re making a digital moodboard, it is essentially a photo collage that you feel conveys what you want your website to convey. Most importantly, you can put it together on sites like Pinterest, or using free services like Morpholio, Evernote, or Niice. You can also glue photos, color swatches, and other elements to a physical mood board to create a more dynamic display, but keep in mind that you will either have to take photos of it, or work with a local Seattle web designer to make that work.

Why Have a Mood Board?

Can’t you just communicate your ideas by writing them? Yes, you can. And if you don’t really understand design, or what you want, then that is a great idea. However, if you want to communicate specific emotions, ideas, or have a vision for your site, a mood board can help to communicate that to your web designer. In fact, most web designers already use mood boards, so it will help to bridge the gap, and show them that you actually know what you want. Mood boards can help you to communicate fonts, needs, color palettes, textures, shadows, and much more. Finally, a moodboard immediately allows you to start getting feedback and input on design choices, colors, and other style decisions so that you can reach a final decision more quickly.

What to Include in Your Mood Board?

Brainstorming a mood board should start out with making decisions. You can start by writing out lists of the following:

  • Your brand personality
  • Brand keywords
  • Brand colors
  • Emotions you want the user to feel
  • Fonts you like (Even serif or sans serif)
  • Styles that represent your business
  • The ‘mood’ of the website
  • Photographs you want on the site

You can take these questions to create a fully functional mood board. For example, if you have a mid-range restaurant catering to foodies in search of new experiences and you want a creative but professional website to reflect your brand personality, you can start out by writing out your list of brand keywords like “delicious”, “unique”, “foodie”, “experience”, “taste maker”, and so on. These words can be used to choose images and items, or inserted directly into the mood board using your preferred fonts.

From there, you could insert your brand’s color palette, such as black and grey with orange accents. Emotions are more difficult to incorporate, but in this case, you want people to feel daring, adventurous, like they are gaining social credit by trying something new, and like they are in a warm and friendly environment with good food. Integrating photos of tasty food, adventurous activities such as skydiving or climbing a tree to get honey, and eating with friends would achieve this. For this example, a stylish sans serif font says modern and friendly, while a mixture of thin and thick lines, no slants, and large photographs show a relaxed but still professional environment and style. Finally, you could pin photos of your own food that you wanted to include.

This type of mood board would very clearly and immediately distinguish your establishment from a restaurant that sells traditional family style Italian food, and the web designer would immediately know what you want, rather than creating a more traditional design for you.

Essentially, a mood board is a bit like your brand profile, in that it communicates what you want and what you like, in a way that your web designer immediately understands.

If you don’t want to create your own moodboard, that’s also okay. Most web designers will work with you to create design ideas from the start, so that you have plenty of options to choose from.

Are you looking for a quality Seattle web designer who can work with your needs to create a site you love? Contact Rory Martin to find out more about our web design services.

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